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ACC Comments on New Report on Industrial Chemicals Published in the Lancet Neurology


Contact: Scott Jensen, (202) 249-6511  
Email: Scott_Jensen@americanchemistry.com

WASHINGTON (Feb. 14, 2014)A new Review calling for world-wide regulation of industrial chemicals by two professors, Philippe Grandjean of Harvard and Philip J. Landrigan of Mt. Sinai Hospital, was published recently in The Lancet Neurology.

The following statement can be attributed to the American Chemistry Council in response to media inquiries:

“While this rehash of the authors’ 2006 opinion paper attempts to review the important subject of childhood brain development, this iteration is as highly flawed as the first, as once again the authors ignore the fundamental scientific principles of exposure and potency. As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has stated, the level of exposure to a chemical is most relevant, not its mere presence. 

“What is most concerning is that the authors focus largely on chemicals and heavy metals that are well understood to be inappropriate for children’s exposure, are highly regulated and/or are restricted or being phased out. They then extrapolate that similar conclusions should be applied to chemicals that are more widely used in consumer products without evidence to support their claims. Such assertions do nothing to advance true scientific understanding and only create confusion and alarm. 

Safety is at the core of our industry; our members go to great lengths to ensure products are safe for their intended uses. More than a dozen laws and six federal agencies oversee chemical safety. And while people should know that the current regulatory system protects health and the environment, we agree it is time to update the federal chemical management system under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The bipartisan Chemical Safety Improvement Act (CSIA) pending in the U.S. Senate will strengthen our national chemical regulatory program, improve chemical safety nationwide and enhance cooperation between state governments and federal regulators. A strong, comprehensive federal chemical assessment and risk management program enhances the safety of all Americans.”

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